Blogging Our Criminal Past, part 3: Public and Creative History

By blogging for a public audience, historians of crime are contributing to popular representations of the ‘criminal’ past, from the many websites, dramas and ‘true crime’ books devoted to notorious cases and neighbourhoods, to the discovery of [...]
Read More »

Blogging Our Criminal Past, part 2: history turned upside down?

Blogging carnivals, like those hosted by Sharon Howard, began to appear in the early 2000s. The carnivalesque is a suggestive way of thinking about the transformative potential of social media. By orchestrating multiple voices blogging has a levelling [...]
Read More »

Blogging Our Criminal Past, part 1

This is a draft of the first part of a short article I’m writing on blogging the history of crime. It’s for a special issue of the online journal Law, Crime & History which will examine on-going discussions at the Our Criminal Past network, [...]
Read More »

Slow Blogging

I did not set out to blog slowly. Today the blogosphere is one of the most productive and inspiring places for writers and researchers to think and work. For historians, like me, and scholars of all varieties, it’s a space for the rapid exchange of ideas [...]
Read More »

“Will you not be glad to go out?”

Thursday 30 January 1840 Somberly, Miss Martin calls the two little boys to her. Tomorrow their thirty day sentence will be up and they will leave her charge. Since their boisterous cellmates departed last weekend, the hours have slipped by slowly without [...]
Read More »

Departure

Friday 24 January 1840 Tomorrow William Hickling, Walter Tunmore and Robert Harrod will leave the prison. Miss Martin meets them for their final exhortation before departure. “How are you to conduct yourselves so that when you meet me I may not feel [...]
Read More »

We need to talk about Walter

23 January 1840 We need to talk about Walter Tunmore because Sarah Martin needs to talk about him. Yesterday was no exception. ‘The boy Tunmore is so quick in movements and manner of speaking and impetuous in temper that it might seem he would be quick in [...]
Read More »

‘And have you brought the combs?’

21 and 22 January 1840 The five young prisoners are listening out for their teacher. They run towards Miss Martin to be the first to carry her Paper Case. “Ma’am, we have been waiting for you!” Endeavouring to keep her face stern, the prison visitor [...]
Read More »

Grey Cotton Shirts

20 January 1840 The five boys in the House of Correction are approaching the end of their month-long sentence but, despite the prison visitor’s efforts, their behaviour is still volatile. Sarah Martin can only spend an hour or so with them each day and [...]
Read More »

Making and Mending

The boys have served more than half their sentences. Less than a fortnight to go. Today they work doggedly on their reading and spelling for over two and a half hours. The teacher is delighted. Since they are keeping to her Rules, she will stay true to her [...]
Read More »

Criminal Historian

Working with dead people

one cool site

WordPress blogging tips tools & tutorials

Notes FROM 19TH CENTURY bIRMINGHAM

an occasional history of the mundane

Past In The Present

Visiting the past with Mark Gee

Meny Snoweballes

Blogging on feminism, medieval studies, teaching and learning

stories from a nineteenth-century prison

Behind the White Coat

Beats a real human heart...

Alex Woodall

Creative Art Museum Interpretation and PhD Research

angels in machines

of bodies changed to various forms by spleen

The Procrastination Salon

No suicides permitted here, and no smoking in the parlor.

A History of Fatherhood in Scotland

Fathers, Fatherhood and Families in Scotland, c.1970-1995

Water Ways: Art and Nature on the Broads

Time and Tide 22 November 2014 - 1 March 2015

Life & 6 Months

Academic, writer, tattooist

H.E. History Hub

Where History matters

THE FREELANCE ACADEMIC

Katie Rose Guest Pryal On Law, Higher Education, & Justice (Broadly Speaking)

The Social Historian

Adventures in the world of social, economic, and local history

Manicule

☛ Thoughts on the Eighteenth Century, Daniel Defoe, and Digital Humanities

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,044 other followers